Iranian-born artist Shirin Abedinirad began her artistic journey with painting, fashion and graphic design and researched conceptual art and the ways it overlaps with fashion design. And, modeling. In 2010, Shirin was chosen as the face of United Colors of Benetton’s F/W International Campaign. Around the same time, she started engaging in performance art pieces around Iran, confronting issues of gender, sexuality and human compassion. It’s pretty heroic of her to do so, considering the country in which she decided to do so in.

She’s now gone and done some exceptional displays of affection that invigorate our DNA make-up: Mesopotamia. In what looks and feels like royalty in a modern world, Abedinirad has recreated the spiritual architecture of two of the world’s most renowned architectural structures—The Ziggurat and The Tower of Babel—in an attempt to connect earth and sky, past and present, through her interactive installations.

Shirin_Abedinirad

The mirrored archetype of the Ziggurat (a common temple in ancient Mesopotamia aimed to connect earth with sky) was hosted in Sydney, Australia at the Underbelly Arts Festival. The Mirrored Ziggurat acts as as staircase to connect nature with human beings, and give the self a transformative view. With seven levels that represent the seven heavens, the mirrors are set to amplify this eternal paradise through light, a mystical concept in Mesopotamian culture.

The mirrored recreation of The Babel Tower created in conjunction with Italian visual artist Gugo Towell has used modern materials to reconcile past with present. As another form of the Ziggurat, it’s the pertinent ancient Pagan temple of the Assyrians and Babylonians.

Through contemporary elements, Abedinirad has attempted to unify concepts of time through for better union in the future, and with an exploration over the two years in video art, moving images, installations notions of self-identity, this femme fatale designs her own costumes, props and sets in both her performance pieces and videos. Bessma Ganakh! (“Good for you!” in Aramaic).

With an exploration over the two years in video art, moving images, installations notions of self-identity, this femme fatale designs her own costumes, props and sets in both her performance pieces and videos.